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blog:2019-04-09

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09-Apr-2019

CBM 1541-II Floppy Disk DriveI've just been reflecting back on the simpler days of computing, on my C64 and C128, and how running software on these machines is so much simpler than today's modern PCs. Even with brand new games being written for these classic systems, all you need to do to get them to run is LOAD them and then RUN them. Even when I purchased a new printer or other peripheral for my Commodore, it was a simple plug-and-play experience. There was no need to go through a lengthy install process or deal with system drivers; unlike today.

It's a very rare thing these days to just simply run a program on your MS-Windows, Mac, or Linux PC. First you have to install it and ensure proper drivers are installed and configured. You have to make sure you have enough space on your hard drive and, for many modern apps, you then have to go on-line and download the necessary updates. What a pain.

This was even more apparent during the brief time I owned an XBox 360. Had the notion of playing a quick game of something? Yeah, well, Microsoft has other plans, as the XBox will now force you into a system upgrade. Oh, and by the way, the network is experiencing a slow down in response time, so if you had plans on going anywhere during the next twenty minutes, forget it! Needless to say, I don't play on any modern consoles anymore. The Wii is packed away and I gave away the XBox 360 several years ago.

I don't have to go through all of this trouble, when using my C128 (or C64). I just power up the computer, insert the disk into the drive and I'm off. There was never a need to update the OS, download drivers, or wade through a frustrating installation process. Even with games or software published today, they are still programmed to run on a 30+ year old stock system. What bliss!

The easier today's PCs are to use, the more complicated and frustrating they've become. I still adore my 64 and 128!

Composed using Archetype on my C128.

blog/2019-04-09.txt · Last modified: 2020/03/01 23:42 by David